CNN’s Brian Stelter accused of ‘mocking the very real concerns of working parents’ with grocery store photo

CNN’s Brian Stelter inflamed Americans Saturday after sharing a photo of a fully stocked Wegmans with a caption that appeared to downplay the supply chain crisis

Across the country, consumers have shared images of empty store shelves amid supply chain shortages. 

Shoppers in a Washington, D.C., suburb reacted to surging grocery prices amid supply chain bottlenecks and rising inflation.

Shoppers in a Washington, D.C., suburb reacted to surging grocery prices amid supply chain bottlenecks and rising inflation.
(Fox News)

But Stelter suggested the situation wasn’t as dire as some have reported by tweeting a photo of a fully stocked grocery store with a telling caption. 

“‘The supply chain!'” she exclaims, looking for milk for 2-year-old,” Stelter wrote. “‘Look at this amazing, overflowing abundance,'” he responds.”

Twitter users were unamused at Stelter’s ill-timed attempt at humor.

“Yes, keep mocking the very real concerns of working parents across the country because your Wegman’s is well-stocked, Brian,” the Heritage Foundation’s John Cooper said. “Great job.” 

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Several others noted that Stelter’s message was misplaced because most milk is produced locally and is not imported.

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“Absolutely thrilled the cargo ships of milk finally came in from overseas,” RedState’s Joe Cunningham quipped. “The nightmare is over.”

Many more debunked Stelter’s narrative by sharing their own photos of depleted store shelves.

Still, other liberal media outlets have taken a page out of Stelter’s book and managed to mock or lecture Americans affected by the supply chain shortages. TIME Magazine was ripped for its “top notch” journalism after publishing a piece entitled, “How American shoppers broke the supply chain.”

Ahead of that report, The Atlantic also appeared to blame U.S. shoppers for the ongoing supply chain shortages. 

“Supply chain problems could be solved more quickly if affluent Americans would stop buying up things they don’t need and often don’t even really want,” the liberal magazine wrote last month.

President Biden checks his watch during an event on global supply chain resilience through the coronavirus pandemic and recovery on the sidelines of the G20 leaders' summit in Rome Oct. 31, 2021.

President Biden checks his watch during an event on global supply chain resilience through the coronavirus pandemic and recovery on the sidelines of the G20 leaders’ summit in Rome Oct. 31, 2021.
(REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque)

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Shoppers in a Washington, D.C., suburb reacted to surging grocery prices amid supply chain bottlenecks and rising inflation.

Shoppers in a Washington, D.C., suburb reacted to surging grocery prices amid supply chain bottlenecks and rising inflation.
(Fox news)

Some Republicans, meanwhile, blame the Biden administration for policies like the continued funding for unemployment in the $1.9 trillion COVID relief package, the closing of the Keystone Pipeline XL and suspending drilling licenses, among other decisions they say have had devastating effects on the U.S. economy.

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