Rapper Master P on his journey from the projects to business mogul: ‘There’s no place better than this’

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Master P, otherwise known as Percy Miller, is sharing how he defied all odds growing up in government projects to become a basketball player, iconic rapper, and ultimately a business mogul. 

“Fox & Friends” co-host Brian KIlmeade met with Miller in his hometown of New Orleans last week to see where his journey started, how he shattered expectations and the key turning points in his journey that facilitated his success. 

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“Even though my kids got a better life and even though we have nice things, but you still got to work for what you want,” Miller said about how he is defying rapper stereotypes in his fatherhood journey. 

“And I’m here for you, but you got to work for what you want, and if whatever you love to do, what you passionate about, I’m going to support you with it, but you need to get up in the morning,” he continued. “You need to educate yourself. You need to go to church, you need to do those things that’s going to make you a good person and have integrity.”

The pair visited Booker T. Washington High School, where Master P went to school, to discuss the role education played in climbing the ladder of success. 

“At first I didn’t take school seriously, but when I started to understand the importance of education and taking it seriously, it changed my life,” Miller told students in the classroom. “It made me make better decisions and choices.”

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Master P arrives to VH1's Hip Hop Honors: The 90's Game Changers at Paramount Studios on September 17, 2017 in Hollywood, California.  (Photo by Gabriel Olsen/FilmMagic)

Master P arrives to VH1’s Hip Hop Honors: The 90’s Game Changers at Paramount Studios on September 17, 2017 in Hollywood, California.  (Photo by Gabriel Olsen/FilmMagic)

But his journey was only just beginning. 

He was an aspiring NBA player, and ultimately played at the University of Houston until an injury sent his dream to a screeching halt. It wasn’t until that injury took place, sending him back to the projects, that he would face the ultimate challenge in defying the odds. 

“Coming back home on that bus, I felt like, I feel like it was over,” Miller said.  

Miller said after arriving back home following his heartbreaking injury, he fell into a life dealing drugs and hanging out with the wrong crowd. 

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Luckily, his grandmother stepped in and opened his eyes to the road he was descending upon. 

“My grandmother really scared me when she put that dress on her nightstand and said she’s going to wear that to my funeral, if I didn’t get my act together,” Miller stated. 

“To be honest with you, I cry to myself and I realize this ain’t the life I wanted, and that’s when I started changing my life, and I think it’s a blessing to have people that care about you, that also give you tough love.”

Miller continued his journey in California, when he decided to renovate the building he was renting to open a recording studio. 

The landlord, also from New Orleans, agreed to give him the building rent-free for an entire year if he cleaned up the space, and ultimately he was able to become a businessman, and a rapper. 

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“I was able to make Forbes fortune under 40,” Miller said. 

Miller also shared his take on race relations in America and how he feels about the current state of affairs. 

“I see that we are hurting as a country, but we are also growing and we growing together stronger together.” Miller said. “I’m patriotic, and I love this country because I don’t feel there’s no other place better than this.”

But Miller’s success doesn’t stop with his rap career. He is also a successful restaurateur. 

Kilmeade also visited his restaurant, Big Poppa’s, and a local grocery store that carries a variety of his products, including “soldier snacks.”

“This is fantastic, it says for those children of our heroes who have sacrificed their life to save ours, Folds of Honor will receive a donation from the soldier snacks for every bag purchased,” Kimeade said. 

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