Supreme Court will become a ‘highly partisan’ body with Biden’s nominee on the bench: Winsome Sears

Virginia Lt. Gov. Winsome Sears, who is the first Black woman – and first woman, period – to hold her position, said Thursday that she hopes President Biden will pick a qualified candidate who “respects the Constitution” when fulfilling his promise to choose a Black female as his Supreme Court nominee.

Sears pointed to a recent ABC News poll that shows more than three-quarters (76%) of Americans want Biden to consider all potential nominees to replace retiring Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer.

BIDEN PROMISED REP. CLYBURN TO NOMINATE BLACK WOMAN TO SUPREME COURT

“What we’re hoping is that, and you saw the poll on it, is that if he’s going to pick a woman, if he’s going to pick a Black woman, that he does pick someone who will respect the Constitution, that she will be a qualified candidate,” Sears said Thursday on “The Story.” “That’s really what we want.”

Former Republican Delegate Winsome Sears celebrates winning the race for Lt. Governor of Virginia as she introduces Republican candidate for Governor Glenn Youngkin during an election night party in Chantilly Virginia, U.S., November 3, 2021. REUTERS/ Jonathan Ernst

Former Republican Delegate Winsome Sears celebrates winning the race for Lt. Governor of Virginia as she introduces Republican candidate for Governor Glenn Youngkin during an election night party in Chantilly Virginia, U.S., November 3, 2021. REUTERS/ Jonathan Ernst
(REUTERS/ Jonathan Ernst)

The poll comes after Biden said that he will announce his nominee before the end of February and confirmed that the candidate will be a Black female. Among Democrats, 54% supported considering all nominees regardless of race and gender. Just 23% of those polled wanted Biden to restrict his list of nominees to Black women.

Sears said that while it’s incumbent on Biden to nominate a deserving candidate for a seat on the high court, the gender and race parameters set by the administration are not unprecedented.

POLL SHOWS MOST AMERICANS WANT BIDEN TO CONSIDER ‘ALL NOMINEES’ IN SUPREME COURT PICK

“It’s really not without precedence. Many people may not realize that the court was very highly partisan for at least the first 100 years of its existence,” Sears said. 

“President Johnson nominated Thurgood Marshall. We all applauded that. We thought that was an excellent thing because it helped to bring the country together,” she continued. “And then people started clamoring for a female. They wanted a woman on the court. So we got Sandra Day O’Connor. We have at various times tried to put people on the court, whether it was not gender but maybe it was religion or some other issue. So as I said, it’s not without precedence.”

U.S. President Joe Biden speaks on the retirement of Supreme Court Associate Justice Stephen Breyer in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, Jan. 27, 2022. The retirement of Breyer is giving Biden a chance to fill the vacancy with the court's first Black woman and setting up a confirmation showdown in the Senate. Photographer: Yuri Gripas/Abaca/Bloomberg via Getty Images

U.S. President Joe Biden speaks on the retirement of Supreme Court Associate Justice Stephen Breyer in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, Jan. 27, 2022. The retirement of Breyer is giving Biden a chance to fill the vacancy with the court’s first Black woman and setting up a confirmation showdown in the Senate. Photographer: Yuri Gripas/Abaca/Bloomberg via Getty Images
(Yuri Gripas/Abaca/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

“The Story” host Martha MacCallum pointed out that Biden blocked the first Black woman from the court as a senator in 2003 when President Bush nominated Janice Rogers Brown. 

“It just raises the question about whether or not this is really more about liberal or conservative and much less about wanting to see people break those barriers that you speak of,” MacCallum said.

“Well, that’s the thing,” Sears responded. “When I first heard that he was going to nominate the first Black woman, I thought to myself, three words. Janice Rogers Brown. Where were you, Mr. President, when we wanted her to be on the Supreme Court?”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“What I’m saying [is], let’s not continue this division,” she said. “It’s not unheard of. We’ve done it with gender, we’ve done it with religion, we’ve done it the race. So the court is kind of going back, or the politics of it anyway is going back to the court’s first 100 years of existence where it was very highly partisan. There’s the precedence.”

Sears said what she believes the country wants “is for someone who respects the Constitution, who is not going to be divisive and who is very highly qualified, who will set aside the politics and judge fairly.”

 

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.